Shoulder Dislocation Treatment
By ROGER G POLLOCK, MD
December 28, 2020

Practically all shoulder dislocation cases are associated with some kind of trauma, whether from being twisted or pulled with excessive force in a backward, upward, or outward direction. In some instances, a dislocated shoulder could result from a forceful blow, falling on your outstretched arm, falling on the shoulder while having a seizure.

Occasionally, a shoulder could be dislocated due to seemingly harmless movements like rolling over while lying down or raising an arm. In these cases, the usual cause is having abnormally loose shoulder ligaments. No matter the cause, it’s vital to see your doctor here at Roger G Pollock, MD in Bergen County, NJ, Dr. Roger Pollock, for prompt diagnosis and treatment.

Do You Have a Dislocated Shoulder?

Shoulder dislocation symptoms typically include the following:

  • Limited shoulder movement
  • Severe shoulder pain
  • A distorted shoulder contour. With an anterior shoulder dislocation, the shoulder’s side portion has an irregular squared-off look rather than a typical rounded, sloping contour. With a posterior shoulder dislocation, the shoulder’s front silhouette might appear irregularly flat.
  • Abrasions or bruising with impact shoulder injuries.
  • A hard knob underneath the shoulder’s skin, which is actually the humerus’ top portion that has been popped out of the socket.

Consult your doctor in Bergen County, NJ, right away if you can’t move your shoulder following a traumatic injury or fall, or if you’re experiencing the symptoms mentioned above.

How is a Shoulder Dislocation Treated?

When your arm bone has been popped out of the socket, it will stay connected to the upper chest and shoulder blade’s muscles. If these particular muscles are still in spasm, your doctor will have to relax them before he can put your arm bone back to its proper place. You may likewise be given pain medications to alleviate your pain and further relax the affected shoulder’s muscles.

Your doctor will carefully pull against these muscles to gently force your dislocated shoulder joint into place. This procedure is called a closed reduction. You’ll then need to wear a sling for a week or so, depending on the severity of your condition. Additionally, you’ll need to follow certain physical therapy exercises to restore your shoulder joint’s normal range of motion and strength.

If your shoulder still feels unstable and loose after physical therapy or still has severe pain, you might require surgery for repairing the supporting tissues of your shoulder joint.

Call Us For Any Concerns or Questions About Shoulder Dislocation

Schedule a meeting with your doctor here at Roger G Pollock, MD in Bergen County, NJ, Dr. Roger Pollock, by calling (201) 612-9774.

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